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Mummified precocial bird wings in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
89 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
twitter
640 tweeters
facebook
37 Facebook pages
wikipedia
6 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
22 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
5 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
57 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
130 Mendeley
Title
Mummified precocial bird wings in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber
Published in
Nature Communications, June 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms12089
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lida Xing, Ryan C. McKellar, Min Wang, Ming Bai, Jingmai K. O’Connor, Michael J. Benton, Jianping Zhang, Yan Wang, Kuowei Tseng, Martin G. Lockley, Gang Li, Weiwei Zhang, Xing Xu

Abstract

Our knowledge of Cretaceous plumage is limited by the fossil record itself: compression fossils surrounding skeletons lack the finest morphological details and seldom preserve visible traces of colour, while discoveries in amber have been disassociated from their source animals. Here we report the osteology, plumage and pterylosis of two exceptionally preserved theropod wings from Burmese amber, with vestiges of soft tissues. The extremely small size and osteological development of the wings, combined with their digit proportions, strongly suggests that the remains represent precocial hatchlings of enantiornithine birds. These specimens demonstrate that the plumage types associated with modern birds were present within single individuals of Enantiornithes by the Cenomanian (99 million years ago), providing insights into plumage arrangement and microstructure alongside immature skeletal remains. This finding brings new detail to our understanding of infrequently preserved juveniles, including the first concrete examples of follicles, feather tracts and apteria in Cretaceous avialans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 640 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 130 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 2%
Spain 2 2%
Germany 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 119 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 24%
Researcher 21 16%
Student > Bachelor 17 13%
Student > Master 15 12%
Other 8 6%
Other 22 17%
Unknown 16 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 52 40%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 38 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 5%
Environmental Science 5 4%
Computer Science 2 2%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 24 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1236. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2021.
All research outputs
#5,730
of 17,947,665 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#102
of 35,599 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110
of 269,506 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,947,665 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 35,599 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 52.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,506 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them