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Ancient horizontal transfers of retrotransposons between birds and ancestors of human pathogenic nematodes

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
20 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
117 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Ancient horizontal transfers of retrotransposons between birds and ancestors of human pathogenic nematodes
Published in
Nature Communications, April 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms11396
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander Suh, Christopher C. Witt, Juliana Menger, Keren R. Sadanandan, Lars Podsiadlowski, Michael Gerth, Anne Weigert, Jimmy A. McGuire, Joann Mudge, Scott V. Edwards, Frank E. Rheindt, Suh, Alexander, Witt, Christopher C, Menger, Juliana, Sadanandan, Keren R, Podsiadlowski, Lars, Gerth, Michael, Weigert, Anne, McGuire, Jimmy A, Mudge, Joann, Edwards, Scott V, Rheindt, Frank E

Abstract

Parasite host switches may trigger disease emergence, but prehistoric host ranges are often unknowable. Lymphatic filariasis and loiasis are major human diseases caused by the insect-borne filarial nematodes Brugia, Wuchereria and Loa. Here we show that the genomes of these nematodes and seven tropical bird lineages exclusively share a novel retrotransposon, AviRTE, resulting from horizontal transfer (HT). AviRTE subfamilies exhibit 83-99% nucleotide identity between genomes, and their phylogenetic distribution, paleobiogeography and invasion times suggest that HTs involved filarial nematodes. The HTs between bird and nematode genomes took place in two pantropical waves, >25-22 million years ago (Myr ago) involving the Brugia/Wuchereria lineage and >20-17 Myr ago involving the Loa lineage. Contrary to the expectation from the mammal-dominated host range of filarial nematodes, we hypothesize that these major human pathogens may have independently evolved from bird endoparasites that formerly infected the global breadth of avian biodiversity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 117 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 10%
Portugal 1 5%
France 1 5%
United States 1 5%
Netherlands 1 5%
Unknown 15 71%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 33%
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Professor 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 10%
Other 5 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 67%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Unspecified 1 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 220. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2017.
All research outputs
#33,801
of 8,652,896 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#510
of 14,086 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,379
of 273,494 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#41
of 787 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,652,896 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,086 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 44.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,494 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 787 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.