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Blast transformation and fibrotic progression in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia: a literature review of incidence and risk factors

Overview of attention for article published in Blood Cancer Journal, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 862)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
19 news outlets
twitter
2 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
118 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
127 Mendeley
Title
Blast transformation and fibrotic progression in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia: a literature review of incidence and risk factors
Published in
Blood Cancer Journal, November 2015
DOI 10.1038/bcj.2015.95
Pubmed ID
Authors

S Cerquozzi, A Tefferi

Abstract

Polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) constitute two of the three BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms and are characterized by relatively long median survivals (approximately 14 and 20 years, respectively). Potentially fatal disease complications in PV and ET include disease transformation into myelofibrosis (MF) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The range of reported frequencies for post-PV MF were 4.9-6% at 10 years and 6-14% at 15 years and for post-ET MF were 0.8-4.9% at 10 years and 4-11% at 15 years. The corresponding figures for post-PV AML were 2.3-14.4% at 10 years and 5.5-18.7% at 15 years and for post-ET AML were 0.7-3% at 10 years and 2.1-5.3% at 15 years. Risk factors cited for post-PV MF include advanced age, leukocytosis, reticulin fibrosis, splenomegaly and JAK2V617F allele burden and for post-ET MF include advanced age, leukocytosis, anemia, reticulin fibrosis, absence of JAK2V617F, use of anagrelide and presence of ASXL1 mutation. Risk factors for post-PV AML include advanced age, leukocytosis, reticulin fibrosis, splenomegaly, abnormal karyotype, TP53 or RUNX1 mutations as well as use of pipobroman, radiophosphorus (P(32)) and busulfan and for post-ET AML include advanced age, leukocytosis, anemia, extreme thrombocytosis, thrombosis, reticulin fibrosis, TP53 or RUNX1 mutations. It is important to note that some of the aforementioned incidence figures and risk factor determinations are probably inaccurate and at times conflicting because of the retrospective nature of studies and the inadvertent labeling, in some studies, of patients with prefibrotic primary MF or 'masked' PV, as ET. Ultimately, transformation of MPN leads to poor outcomes and management remains challenging. Further understanding of the molecular events leading to disease transformation is being investigated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 <1%
Unknown 126 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 16%
Other 19 15%
Researcher 17 13%
Student > Bachelor 14 11%
Student > Master 12 9%
Other 26 20%
Unknown 19 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 64 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 3%
Computer Science 2 2%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 22 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 142. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 December 2020.
All research outputs
#176,818
of 18,523,374 outputs
Outputs from Blood Cancer Journal
#5
of 862 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,598
of 292,042 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Blood Cancer Journal
#1
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,523,374 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 862 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,042 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.