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Multilevel animal societies can emerge from cultural transmission.

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
29 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
twitter
202 tweeters
facebook
11 Facebook pages
googleplus
5 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
238 Mendeley
Title
Multilevel animal societies can emerge from cultural transmission.
Published in
Nature Communications, September 2015
DOI 10.1038/ncomms9091
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maurício Cantor, Lauren G. Shoemaker, Reniel B. Cabral, César O. Flores, Melinda Varga, Hal Whitehead, Cantor, Maurício, Shoemaker, Lauren G, Cabral, Reniel B, Flores, César O, Varga, Melinda, Whitehead, Hal

Abstract

Multilevel societies, containing hierarchically nested social levels, are remarkable social structures whose origins are unclear. The social relationships of sperm whales are organized in a multilevel society with an upper level composed of clans of individuals communicating using similar patterns of clicks (codas). Using agent-based models informed by an 18-year empirical study, we show that clans are unlikely products of stochastic processes (genetic or cultural drift) but likely originate from cultural transmission via biased social learning of codas. Distinct clusters of individuals with similar acoustic repertoires, mirroring the empirical clans, emerge when whales learn preferentially the most common codas (conformism) from behaviourally similar individuals (homophily). Cultural transmission seems key in the partitioning of sperm whales into sympatric clans. These findings suggest that processes similar to those that generate complex human cultures could not only be at play in non-human societies but also create multilevel social structures in the wild.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 202 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 238 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 10 4%
United States 6 3%
Brazil 4 2%
Germany 3 1%
Netherlands 3 1%
Mexico 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Senegal 1 <1%
Other 7 3%
Unknown 200 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 75 32%
Researcher 46 19%
Student > Master 28 12%
Student > Bachelor 25 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 7%
Other 45 19%
Unknown 3 1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 154 65%
Environmental Science 23 10%
Physics and Astronomy 12 5%
Social Sciences 8 3%
Psychology 6 3%
Other 32 13%
Unknown 3 1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 458. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 November 2016.
All research outputs
#8,427
of 7,676,456 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#119
of 11,695 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#388
of 229,781 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#6
of 707 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,676,456 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,695 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 42.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,781 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 707 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.