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Habitual hot water bathing protects cardiovascular function in middle-aged to elderly Japanese subjects

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
26 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
Title
Habitual hot water bathing protects cardiovascular function in middle-aged to elderly Japanese subjects
Published in
Scientific Reports, June 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-26908-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katsuhiko Kohara, Yasuharu Tabara, Masayuki Ochi, Yoko Okada, Maya Ohara, Tokihisa Nagai, Yasumasa Ohyagi, Michiya Igase

Abstract

Favorable effects of sauna bathing on cardiovascular disease have been demonstrated. Hot water bathing is an alternative, and could also have similar effects. Information pertaining to hot water bathing frequency and water temperature was obtained from 873 subjects. Carotid mean and max intima-media thickness (IMT) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were measured as indices of atherosclerosis. Central haemodynamics were evaluated using radial pulse waveform analyses. Plasma levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured as an index for cardiac loading. The mean duration of a single hot bath was 12.4 ± 9.9 min. Subject bathing in hot water ≥5 times per week had significantly lower baPWV, central pulse pressure (PP), and BNP after correcting for possible confounding parameters. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that hot water temperature was negatively associated with baPWV, while bathing frequency was negatively related to central PP and BNP. A longitudinal follow-up in 164 subjects showed that hot water bathing ≥5 times per week was associated with significantly lower increase in BNP over time, while the temperature of the water tended to be related to lower increases in carotid max IMT and baPWV. Hot water bathing showed a favorable effect on atherosclerotic and central haemodynamic parameters.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 26 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Professor 2 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 6 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Psychology 2 9%
Sports and Recreations 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 7 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2021.
All research outputs
#563,896
of 17,883,304 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#6,350
of 96,686 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,066
of 285,497 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#3
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,883,304 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 96,686 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,497 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.