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Drosophila glucome screening identifies Ck1alpha as a regulator of mammalian glucose metabolism

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
100 Mendeley
Title
Drosophila glucome screening identifies Ck1alpha as a regulator of mammalian glucose metabolism
Published in
Nature Communications, May 2015
DOI 10.1038/ncomms8102
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rupali Ugrankar, Eric Berglund, Fatih Akdemir, Christopher Tran, Min Soo Kim, Jungsik Noh, Rebekka Schneider, Benjamin Ebert, Jonathan M. Graff

Abstract

Circulating carbohydrates are an essential energy source, perturbations in which are pathognomonic of various diseases, diabetes being the most prevalent. Yet many of the genes underlying diabetes and its characteristic hyperglycaemia remain elusive. Here we use physiological and genetic interrogations in D. melanogaster to uncover the 'glucome', the complete set of genes involved in glucose regulation in flies. Partial genomic screens of ∼1,000 genes yield ∼160 hyperglycaemia 'flyabetes' candidates that we classify using fat body- and muscle-specific knockdown and biochemical assays. The results highlight the minor glucose fraction as a physiological indicator of metabolism in Drosophila. The hits uncovered in our screen may have conserved functions in mammalian glucose homeostasis, as heterozygous and homozygous mutants of Ck1alpha in the murine adipose lineage, develop diabetes. Our findings demonstrate that glucose has a role in fly biology and that genetic screenings carried out in flies may increase our understanding of mammalian pathophysiology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 98 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 31%
Researcher 21 21%
Student > Master 12 12%
Student > Bachelor 9 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 4%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 11 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 41 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 32 32%
Neuroscience 6 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Psychology 1 1%
Other 4 4%
Unknown 14 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2015.
All research outputs
#2,199,815
of 17,069,711 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#19,343
of 33,386 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,636
of 240,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#338
of 652 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,069,711 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 33,386 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 51.5. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,468 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 652 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.