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The role of acetic acid on glucose uptake and blood flow rates in the skeletal muscle in humans with impaired glucose tolerance

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
57 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
Title
The role of acetic acid on glucose uptake and blood flow rates in the skeletal muscle in humans with impaired glucose tolerance
Published in
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, January 2015
DOI 10.1038/ejcn.2014.289
Pubmed ID
Authors

P Mitrou, E Petsiou, E Papakonstantinou, E Maratou, V Lambadiari, P Dimitriadis, F Spanoudi, S A Raptis, G Dimitriadis

Abstract

Background/Objectives:Previous studies support the glucose-lowering effect of vinegar. However, the effect of vinegar on muscle glucose metabolism and endothelial function has not been studied in humans. This open, randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled study aims to investigate the effects of vinegar on muscle glucose metabolism, endothelial function and circulating lipid levels in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) using the arteriovenous difference technique.Subjects/Methods:Eight subjects with IGT (4 males, age 46±10 years, body mass index 30±5) were randomised to consume 0.50 mmol vinegar (6% acetic acid) or placebo before a mixed meal. Plasma samples were taken for 300 min from the radial artery and the forearm vein for measurements of glucose, insulin, triglycerides, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) and glycerol. Muscle blood flow was measured with strain gauge plethysmography. Glucose flux was calculated as the arteriovenous difference of glucose multiplied by the blood flow rates.Results:Vinegar compared with placebo: (1) decreased arterial plasma insulin (Poverall<0.001; P75 min=0.014, β=-42), (2) increased forearm blood flow (Poverall<0.001; P240 min=0.011, β=1.53; P300 min=0.023, β=1.37), (3) increased muscle glucose uptake (Poverall<0.001; P60 min=0.029, β=2.78) and (4) decreased arterial plasma triglycerides (Poverall=0.005; P240 min<0.001, β=-344; P300 min<0.001, β=-373), without changing NEFA and glycerol.Conclusions:In individuals with IGT, vinegar ingestion before a mixed meal results in an enhancement of muscle blood flow, an improvement of glucose uptake by the forearm muscle and a reduction of postprandial hyperinsulinaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia. From this point of view, vinegar may be considered beneficial for improving insulin resistance and metabolic abnormalities in the atherogenic prediabetic state.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 28 January 2015; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2014.289.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 57 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 15 18%
Student > Master 14 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 11%
Researcher 8 10%
Student > Postgraduate 6 7%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 20 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 5%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 23 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 105. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 February 2020.
All research outputs
#260,692
of 19,059,873 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#94
of 3,597 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,074
of 305,896 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#1
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,059,873 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,597 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 305,896 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.