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Pattern formation at multiple spatial scales drives the resilience of mussel bed ecosystems

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
8 X users
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
131 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
178 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Pattern formation at multiple spatial scales drives the resilience of mussel bed ecosystems
Published in
Nature Communications, October 2014
DOI 10.1038/ncomms6234
Pubmed ID
Authors

Quan-Xing Liu, Peter M. J. Herman, Wolf M. Mooij, Jef Huisman, Marten Scheffer, Han Olff, Johan van de Koppel

Abstract

Self-organized complexity at multiple spatial scales is a distinctive characteristic of biological systems. Yet, little is known about how different self-organizing processes operating at different spatial scales interact to determine ecosystem functioning. Here we show that the interplay between self-organizing processes at individual and ecosystem level is a key determinant of the functioning and resilience of mussel beds. In mussel beds, self-organization generates spatial patterns at two characteristic spatial scales: small-scale net-shaped patterns due to behavioural aggregation of individuals, and large-scale banded patterns due to the interplay of between-mussel facilitation and resource depletion. Model analysis reveals that the interaction between these behavioural and ecosystem-level mechanisms increases mussel bed resilience, enables persistence under deteriorating conditions and makes them less prone to catastrophic collapse. Our analysis highlights that interactions between different forms of self-organization at multiple spatial scales may enhance the intrinsic ability of ecosystems to withstand both natural and human-induced disturbances.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 178 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 172 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 50 28%
Student > Master 26 15%
Researcher 22 12%
Student > Bachelor 12 7%
Professor 7 4%
Other 23 13%
Unknown 38 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 24%
Environmental Science 36 20%
Physics and Astronomy 11 6%
Engineering 11 6%
Mathematics 7 4%
Other 28 16%
Unknown 43 24%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 70. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2019.
All research outputs
#515,925
of 22,807,037 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#9,124
of 46,956 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,003
of 260,416 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#106
of 751 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,807,037 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 46,956 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 55.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,416 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 751 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.