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Continual reproduction of self-assembling oligotriazole peptide nanomaterials

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
6 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
Title
Continual reproduction of self-assembling oligotriazole peptide nanomaterials
Published in
Nature Communications, September 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41467-017-00849-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Roberto J. Brea, Neal K. Devaraj

Abstract

Autocatalytic chemical reactions, whereby a molecule is able to catalyze its own formation from a set of precursors, mimic nature's ability to generate identical copies of relevant biomolecules, and are thought to have been crucial for the origin of life. While several molecular autocatalysts have been previously reported, coupling autocatalytic behavior to macromolecular self-assembly has been challenging. Here, we report a non-enzymatic and chemoselective methodology capable of autocatalytically producing triskelion peptides that self-associate into spherical bioinspired nanostructures. Serial transfer experiments demonstrate that oligotriazole autocatalysis successfully leads to continual self-assembly of three-dimensional nanospheres. Triskelion-based spherical architectures offer an opportunity to organize biomolecules and chemical reactions in unique, nanoscale compartments. The use of peptide-based autocatalysts that are capable of self-assembly represents a promising method for the development of self-synthesizing biomaterials, and may shed light on understanding life's chemical origins.Molecules that act as both autocatalysts and material precursors offer exciting prospects for self-synthesizing materials. Here, the authors design a triazole peptide that self-replicates and then self-assembles into nanostructures, coupling autocatalytic and assembly pathways to realize a reproducing supramolecular system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 30%
Student > Master 5 11%
Researcher 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 24 55%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Materials Science 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 7 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,132,439
of 13,451,724 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#11,662
of 23,991 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,177
of 271,987 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#170
of 445 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,451,724 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 23,991 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,987 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 445 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.