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The impact of human population pressure on flying fox niches and the potential consequences for Hendra virus spillover

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
33 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
97 Mendeley
Title
The impact of human population pressure on flying fox niches and the potential consequences for Hendra virus spillover
Published in
Scientific Reports, August 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-08065-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael G. Walsh, Anke Wiethoelter, M. A. Haseeb

Abstract

Hendra virus (HeV) is an emerging pathogen of concern in Australia given its ability to spillover from its reservoir host, pteropid bats, to horses and further on to humans, and the severe clinical presentation typical in these latter incidental hosts. Specific human pressures over recent decades, such as expanding human populations, urbanization, and forest fragmentation, may have altered the ecological niche of Pteropus species acting as natural HeV reservoirs and may modulate spillover risk. This study explored the influence of inter-decadal net human local migration between 1970 and 2000 on changes in the habitat suitability to P. alecto and P. conspicillatus from 1980 to 2015 in eastern Australia. These ecological niches were modeled using boosted regression trees and subsequently fitted, along with additional landscape factors, to HeV spillovers to explore the spatial dependency of this zoonosis. The spatial model showed that the ecological niche of these two flying fox species, the human footprint, and proximity to woody savanna were each strongly associated with HeV spillover and together explained most of the spatial dependency exhibited by this zoonosis. These findings reinforce the potential for anthropogenic pressures to shape the landscape epidemiology of HeV spillover.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 97 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 20%
Student > Master 19 20%
Researcher 15 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 14%
Student > Postgraduate 4 4%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 21 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 30%
Environmental Science 13 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 5%
Other 11 11%
Unknown 27 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 291. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2020.
All research outputs
#75,795
of 19,835,362 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#981
of 105,768 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,962
of 235,339 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#5
of 209 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,835,362 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 105,768 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,339 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 209 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.