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Transboundary health impacts of transported global air pollution and international trade

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
51 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
667 tweeters
facebook
16 Facebook pages
googleplus
8 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
326 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
470 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
Title
Transboundary health impacts of transported global air pollution and international trade
Published in
Nature, March 2017
DOI 10.1038/nature21712
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qiang Zhang, Xujia Jiang, Dan Tong, Steven J. Davis, Hongyan Zhao, Guannan Geng, Tong Feng, Bo Zheng, Zifeng Lu, David G. Streets, Ruijing Ni, Michael Brauer, Aaron van Donkelaar, Randall V. Martin, Hong Huo, Zhu Liu, Da Pan, Haidong Kan, Yingying Yan, Jintai Lin, Kebin He, Dabo Guan

Abstract

Millions of people die every year from diseases caused by exposure to outdoor air pollution. Some studies have estimated premature mortality related to local sources of air pollution, but local air quality can also be affected by atmospheric transport of pollution from distant sources. International trade is contributing to the globalization of emission and pollution as a result of the production of goods (and their associated emissions) in one region for consumption in another region. The effects of international trade on air pollutant emissions, air quality and health have been investigated regionally, but a combined, global assessment of the health impacts related to international trade and the transport of atmospheric air pollution is lacking. Here we combine four global models to estimate premature mortality caused by fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution as a result of atmospheric transport and the production and consumption of goods and services in different world regions. We find that, of the 3.45 million premature deaths related to PM2.5 pollution in 2007 worldwide, about 12 per cent (411,100 deaths) were related to air pollutants emitted in a region of the world other than that in which the death occurred, and about 22 per cent (762,400 deaths) were associated with goods and services produced in one region for consumption in another. For example, PM2.5 pollution produced in China in 2007 is linked to more than 64,800 premature deaths in regions other than China, including more than 3,100 premature deaths in western Europe and the USA; on the other hand, consumption in western Europe and the USA is linked to more than 108,600 premature deaths in China. Our results reveal that the transboundary health impacts of PM2.5 pollution associated with international trade are greater than those associated with long-distance atmospheric pollutant transport.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 667 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 470 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 <1%
Germany 3 <1%
Hong Kong 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 457 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 99 21%
Researcher 76 16%
Student > Master 70 15%
Student > Bachelor 33 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 23 5%
Other 90 19%
Unknown 79 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 121 26%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 46 10%
Engineering 34 7%
Social Sciences 19 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 18 4%
Other 105 22%
Unknown 127 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 971. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2020.
All research outputs
#7,660
of 16,651,613 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#1,031
of 77,490 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#259
of 268,907 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#31
of 846 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,651,613 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,490 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 88.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,907 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 846 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.