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Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, September 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Citations

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8568 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
6081 Mendeley
citeulike
44 CiteULike
Title
Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours
Published in
Nature, September 2012
DOI 10.1038/nature11412
Pubmed ID
Abstract

We analysed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at >10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein-expression-defined subgroups, possibly produced by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signalling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/phosphorylated HER2/EGFR/phosphorylated EGFR signature within the HER2-enriched expression subtype. Comparison of basal-like breast tumours with high-grade serous ovarian tumours showed many molecular commonalities, indicating a related aetiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biological finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biological subtypes of breast cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 197 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6,081 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 83 1%
United Kingdom 23 <1%
Spain 15 <1%
Canada 9 <1%
Brazil 9 <1%
Netherlands 9 <1%
Italy 8 <1%
Japan 8 <1%
Germany 8 <1%
Other 81 1%
Unknown 5828 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 1382 23%
Researcher 1137 19%
Student > Master 737 12%
Student > Bachelor 582 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 335 6%
Other 1037 17%
Unknown 871 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1681 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1373 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 1061 17%
Computer Science 222 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 121 2%
Other 588 10%
Unknown 1035 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 323. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2022.
All research outputs
#75,326
of 21,440,657 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#6,176
of 88,066 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#315
of 152,139 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#52
of 1,042 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,440,657 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 88,066 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 97.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 152,139 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,042 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.