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Beyond expectations: the physiological basis of sensory enhancement of satiety

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Obesity, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
Title
Beyond expectations: the physiological basis of sensory enhancement of satiety
Published in
International Journal of Obesity, June 2016
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2016.112
Pubmed ID
Authors

M R Yeomans, R Re, M Wickham, H Lundholm, L Chambers

Abstract

Consumption of high-energy beverages has been implicated as a risk factor for weight gain, yet why nutrients ingested as beverages fail to generate adequate satiety remains unclear. In general consumers do not expect drinks to be satiating, but drinks generate greater satiety when their sensory characteristics imply they may be filling. These findings challenge traditional bottom-up models of how gut-based satiety signals modify behavior to suggest that beliefs at the point of ingestion modify gut-based satiety signaling. Healthy volunteers (n=23) consumed four different beverages, combining an overt sensory manipulation (thin, Low Sensory, LS, or thicker and more creamy, Enhanced Sensory, ES) and covert nutrient manipulation (low energy, LE, 78kcal; high energy, HE, 267 kcal) on different days. Effects on satiety were assessed through rated appetite and levels of glucose, insulin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and cholesystokinin (CCK) recorded periodically over 90 min, and through intake at an ad libitum test lunch. Intake at the test lunch and rated appetite were both altered by both the sensory and nutrient manipulations, with lowest intake and greatest suppression of hunger post-drink in the ESHE condition. Insulin increased more after HE than LE drinks, and after ES than LS drinks, while PP levels were higher after ES than LS versions. CCK levels only increased after the ESHE drink. These data confirm acute sensitivity of satiety after consuming a drink both to the sensory characteristics and nutrient content of the drink, and suggest that this may be at least in part due to top-down modulation of release of satiety-related gut hormones.International Journal of Obesity accepted article preview online, 17 June 2016. doi:10.1038/ijo.2016.112.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 30%
Researcher 9 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 18%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 2 5%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 4 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 7 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 11 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2016.
All research outputs
#1,685,635
of 14,479,227 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Obesity
#1,061
of 3,467 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,660
of 265,315 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Obesity
#28
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,479,227 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,467 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,315 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.