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Selective cortical representation of attended speaker in multi-talker speech perception

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, April 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
18 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
50 tweeters
patent
2 patents
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
577 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1083 Mendeley
citeulike
6 CiteULike
Title
Selective cortical representation of attended speaker in multi-talker speech perception
Published in
Nature, April 2012
DOI 10.1038/nature11020
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nima Mesgarani, Edward F. Chang

Abstract

Humans possess a remarkable ability to attend to a single speaker's voice in a multi-talker background. How the auditory system manages to extract intelligible speech under such acoustically complex and adverse listening conditions is not known, and, indeed, it is not clear how attended speech is internally represented. Here, using multi-electrode surface recordings from the cortex of subjects engaged in a listening task with two simultaneous speakers, we demonstrate that population responses in non-primary human auditory cortex encode critical features of attended speech: speech spectrograms reconstructed based on cortical responses to the mixture of speakers reveal the salient spectral and temporal features of the attended speaker, as if subjects were listening to that speaker alone. A simple classifier trained solely on examples of single speakers can decode both attended words and speaker identity. We find that task performance is well predicted by a rapid increase in attention-modulated neural selectivity across both single-electrode and population-level cortical responses. These findings demonstrate that the cortical representation of speech does not merely reflect the external acoustic environment, but instead gives rise to the perceptual aspects relevant for the listener's intended goal.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 50 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,083 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 45 4%
Germany 11 1%
United Kingdom 11 1%
France 6 <1%
Netherlands 6 <1%
Canada 5 <1%
Japan 4 <1%
Belgium 4 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
Other 19 2%
Unknown 969 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 303 28%
Researcher 225 21%
Student > Master 102 9%
Student > Bachelor 78 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 64 6%
Other 213 20%
Unknown 98 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 193 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 181 17%
Neuroscience 180 17%
Engineering 136 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 69 6%
Other 166 15%
Unknown 158 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 209. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 November 2021.
All research outputs
#117,200
of 19,561,042 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#9,167
of 84,241 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#468
of 138,066 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#72
of 933 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,561,042 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 84,241 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 94.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 138,066 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 933 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.