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The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera

Overview of attention for article published in Gene Therapy, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
5 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
Title
The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera
Published in
Gene Therapy, March 2016
DOI 10.1038/gt.2016.32
Pubmed ID
Authors

M R Duffy, A Doszpoly, G Turner, S A Nicklin, A H Baker

Abstract

Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5:FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad:FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy.Gene Therapy accepted article preview online, 25 March 2016. doi:10.1038/gt.2016.32.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 22%
Student > Master 5 22%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Researcher 2 9%
Professor 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 9%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2021.
All research outputs
#1,233,686
of 18,234,522 outputs
Outputs from Gene Therapy
#62
of 2,814 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,541
of 272,900 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gene Therapy
#5
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,234,522 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,814 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,900 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.