↓ Skip to main content

Increasing the information rates of optical communications via coded modulation: a study of transceiver performance

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, February 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
22 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
18 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
41 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
Title
Increasing the information rates of optical communications via coded modulation: a study of transceiver performance
Published in
Scientific Reports, February 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep21278
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert Maher, Alex Alvarado, Domaniç Lavery, Polina Bayvel

Abstract

Optical fibre underpins the global communications infrastructure and has experienced an astonishing evolution over the past four decades, with current commercial systems transmitting data rates in excess of 10 Tb/s over a single fibre core. The continuation of this dramatic growth in throughput has become constrained due to a power dependent nonlinear distortion arising from a phenomenon known as the Kerr effect. The mitigation of fibre nonlinearities is an area of intense research. However, even in the absence of nonlinear distortion, the practical limit on the transmission throughput of a single fibre core is dominated by the finite signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) afforded by current state-of-the-art coherent optical transceivers. Therefore, the key to maximising the number of information bits that can be reliably transmitted over a fibre channel hinges on the simultaneous optimisation of the modulation format and code rate, based on the SNR achieved at the receiver. In this work, we use an information theoretic approach based on the mutual information and the generalised mutual information to characterise a state-of-the-art dual polarisation m-ary quadrature amplitude modulation transceiver and subsequently apply this methodology to a 15-carrier super-channel to achieve the highest throughput (1.125 Tb/s) ever recorded using a single coherent receiver.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 54 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 29%
Student > Master 6 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 5 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 37 67%
Physics and Astronomy 7 13%
Computer Science 4 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 214. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 November 2018.
All research outputs
#83,141
of 15,822,879 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#1,069
of 82,400 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,425
of 346,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#13
of 841 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,822,879 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 82,400 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,392 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 841 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.