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Experience-independent sex differences in newborn macaques: Females are more social than males

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
401 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
63 Mendeley
Title
Experience-independent sex differences in newborn macaques: Females are more social than males
Published in
Scientific Reports, January 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep19669
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth A. Simpson, Ylenia Nicolini, Melissa Shetler, Stephen J. Suomi, Pier F. Ferrari, Annika Paukner

Abstract

Human females exhibit greater social interest and skills relative to males, appearing in infancy, suggesting biological roots; however, male and female infants may be treated differently, potentially causing or amplifying sex differences. Here, we tested whether sex differences in social motivation emerge in infant monkeys (n = 48) reared in a controlled postnatal environment. Compared to males, females at 2-3 weeks looked more at conspecifics' faces (d = 0.65), especially the eyes (d = 1.09), and at 4-5 weeks exhibited more affiliative behaviors (d = 0.64), including gesturing, looking, and proximity to familiar and unfamiliar human caretakers. In sum, converging evidence from humans and monkeys suggests that female infants are more social than males in the first weeks of life, and that such differences may arise independent of postnatal experience. Individual differences in social interest have wide-ranging developmental consequences, impacting infants' social interaction quality and opportunities for learning. Understanding the evolution of sex differences and their developmental emergence is necessary to best support infants with varying levels of sociality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 401 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 62 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 24%
Researcher 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Student > Master 5 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 17 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 13%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Neuroscience 4 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 23 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 315. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 May 2021.
All research outputs
#61,436
of 18,346,324 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#796
of 98,966 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,428
of 352,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#7
of 911 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,346,324 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 98,966 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 352,051 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 911 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.