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Arsenic stress after the Proterozoic glaciations

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
Title
Arsenic stress after the Proterozoic glaciations
Published in
Scientific Reports, December 2015
DOI 10.1038/srep17789
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ernest Chi Fru, Emma Arvestål, Nolwenn Callac, Abderrazak El Albani, Stephanos Kilias, Ariadne Argyraki, Martin Jakobsson

Abstract

Protection against arsenic damage in organisms positioned deep in the tree of life points to early evolutionary sensitization. Here, marine sedimentary records reveal a Proterozoic arsenic concentration patterned to glacial-interglacial ages. The low glacial and high interglacial sedimentary arsenic concentrations, suggest deteriorating habitable marine conditions may have coincided with atmospheric oxygen decline after ~2.1 billion years ago. A similar intensification of near continental margin sedimentary arsenic levels after the Cryogenian glaciations is also associated with amplified continental weathering. However, interpreted atmospheric oxygen increase at this time, suggests that the marine biosphere had widely adapted to the reorganization of global marine elemental cycles by glaciations. Such a glacially induced biogeochemical bridge would have produced physiologically robust communities that enabled increased oxygenation of the ocean-atmosphere system and the radiation of the complex Ediacaran-Cambrian life.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 34 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Student > Master 4 11%
Professor 4 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 8%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 14 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 14%
Environmental Science 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 9 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 100. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2015.
All research outputs
#250,052
of 17,732,250 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#2,937
of 95,612 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,159
of 375,291 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#111
of 3,544 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,732,250 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 95,612 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 375,291 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,544 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.