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Prevalence and correlates of erectile dysfunction in type 2 diabetic men: a population-based cross-sectional study in Chinese men

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Impotence Research, August 2018
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2 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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29 Mendeley
Title
Prevalence and correlates of erectile dysfunction in type 2 diabetic men: a population-based cross-sectional study in Chinese men
Published in
International Journal of Impotence Research, August 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41443-018-0060-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yawei Xu, Yuanyuan Zhang, Yongjiao Yang, Li Liu, Yegang Chen, Xiaoqiang Liu

Abstract

The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and correlates of erectile dysfunction (ED) in a sample of Chinese type 2 diabetic men. Between October 2016 and April 2017, male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated in our diabetes outpatient clinic were recruited in this study. The participants were asked to complete a short version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5), which was a validated and self-administered questionnaire for the diagnosis and grading of ED severity. All patients screened for erectile function also underwent detailed physical examination, and interviewed for demographic and medical history. A total of 550 men were recruited in this study, of whom 20 patients were excluded and 35 did not complete all scheduled study procedures, leaving 495 patients in the final analysis. As determined by IIEF-5 score, 318 (64.2%) patients had ED. Among the 318 patients with ED, mild, mild-to-moderate, moderate, and severe were 37 (11.6%), 65 (20.4%), 95 (29.9%), and 121 (38.1%), respectively. The prevalence of ED in patients with high education, secondary education, and less than secondary education were 83.3%, 60.2%, and 35.4%, respectively (P < 0.0001). The prevalence of ED was 64.2% in Chinese type 2 diabetic men. Increased age, longer duration of diabetes mellitus, and worse glycemic control may promote the progression of ED among Chinese type 2 diabetic men. We also found that the higher education levels may increase the risk of ED in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 28%
Student > Bachelor 6 21%
Researcher 4 14%
Lecturer 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 55%
Psychology 3 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Neuroscience 1 3%
Unknown 6 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2018.
All research outputs
#8,378,100
of 13,370,967 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Impotence Research
#511
of 658 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#159,537
of 266,773 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Impotence Research
#8
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,370,967 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 658 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,773 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.