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The glycaemic index of dates and date/yoghurt mixed meals. Are dates ‘the candy that grows on trees’?

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, March 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
63 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
Title
The glycaemic index of dates and date/yoghurt mixed meals. Are dates ‘the candy that grows on trees’?
Published in
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, March 2003
DOI 10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601565
Pubmed ID
Authors

C J Miller, E V Dunn, I B Hashim

Abstract

To determine the glycaemic index of one variety of date, alone and in mixed meals with plain full-milk yoghurt. An experimental study involving the measurement of the glycaemic responses of participants to the ingestion of dates, alone and with yoghurt. Within the Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University. Healthy male and female volunteers aged 32-67 y. Glycaemic responses to date and date/yoghurt meal ingestion were plotted for each subject. Glycaemic indexes were calculated as the ratios of the incremental areas under these response curves to those for glucose ingestion. Results are presented using means and standard deviations. Glycaemic indexes were compared using paired t-tests. Mean glycaemic indexes of the dates were 47.2, 45.3, 35.5, 37.3, 28.9 for rutab, traditionally stored, commercial, rutab/yoghurt and commercial tamer/yoghurt preparations, respectively. There was a significant difference between the results for rutab vs commercial tamer dates (P<0.05), but other comparisons failed to reach statistical significance. Khalas dates, when eaten alone or in mixed meals with plain yoghurt have low glycaemic indexes. The consumption of dates may be of benefit in glycaemic and lipid control of diabetic patients. The consumption of dates in mixed meals with yoghurt appears to have, at most, a minimal effect on the glycaemic index.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 11%
Researcher 6 10%
Student > Master 6 10%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 15 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 19 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 February 2020.
All research outputs
#1,084,456
of 17,036,910 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#483
of 3,448 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,050
of 235,870 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#14
of 62 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,036,910 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,448 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,870 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 62 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.