↓ Skip to main content

Backpack weight and back pain reduction: effect of an intervention in adolescents

Overview of attention for article published in Pediatric Research, May 2018
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
Title
Backpack weight and back pain reduction: effect of an intervention in adolescents
Published in
Pediatric Research, May 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41390-018-0013-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paloma Rodríguez-Oviedo, María Isolina Santiago-Pérez, Mónica Pérez-Ríos, Dorotea Gómez-Fernández, Anselmo Fernández-Alonso, Isabel Carreira-Núñez, Pilar García-Pacios, Alberto Ruano-Ravina

Abstract

To assess if an educational intervention is effective to reduce backpack weight and back pain in schoolchildren. We designed an intervention study in schoolchildren aged between 12 and 16 years aimed to reduce the weight of backpacks and back pain. The intervention was multifaceted, including an educational intervention with practical examples, advising on performing sports, postural habits, leaflets, stickers, and so on. The comparison group did not receive any intervention. A total of 1668 schoolchildren took part in the study. We observed a high prevalence of carrying heavy backpacks, with 66-80% of schoolchildren carrying backpacks surpassing 10% of their body weight. Back pain prevalence was 30%. We observed that the intervention was significant in reducing the backpack weight in first-year schoolchildren but not in second-year. The intervention was also significant in reducing back pain in third-year schoolchildren but only in girls. This study shows that an inexpensive intervention directed to reduce the backpack weight and back pain might have a positive effect in schoolchildren.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Researcher 3 7%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 4%
Other 10 22%
Unknown 19 41%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 11%
Sports and Recreations 4 9%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 22 48%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 May 2018.
All research outputs
#10,355,348
of 12,979,316 outputs
Outputs from Pediatric Research
#2,350
of 2,990 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,217
of 271,226 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pediatric Research
#55
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,979,316 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,990 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,226 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.