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Genomic-scale prioritization of drug targets: the TDR Targets database

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, October 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
patent
1 patent
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
232 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
272 Mendeley
citeulike
7 CiteULike
connotea
3 Connotea
Title
Genomic-scale prioritization of drug targets: the TDR Targets database
Published in
Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, October 2008
DOI 10.1038/nrd2684
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fernán Agüero, Bissan Al-Lazikani, Martin Aslett, Matthew Berriman, Frederick S. Buckner, Robert K. Campbell, Santiago Carmona, Ian M. Carruthers, A. W. Edith Chan, Feng Chen, Gregory J. Crowther, Maria A. Doyle, Christiane Hertz-Fowler, Andrew L. Hopkins, Gregg McAllister, Solomon Nwaka, John P. Overington, Arnab Pain, Gaia V. Paolini, Ursula Pieper, Stuart A. Ralph, Aaron Riechers, David S. Roos, Andrej Sali, Dhanasekaran Shanmugam, Takashi Suzuki, Wesley C. Van Voorhis, Christophe L. M. J. Verlinde

Abstract

The increasing availability of genomic data for pathogens that cause tropical diseases has created new opportunities for drug discovery and development. However, if the potential of such data is to be fully exploited, the data must be effectively integrated and be easy to interrogate. Here, we discuss the development of the TDR Targets database (http://tdrtargets.org), which encompasses extensive genetic, biochemical and pharmacological data related to tropical disease pathogens, as well as computationally predicted druggability for potential targets and compound desirability information. By allowing the integration and weighting of this information, this database aims to facilitate the identification and prioritization of candidate drug targets for pathogens.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 272 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 7 3%
United Kingdom 6 2%
United States 5 2%
India 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Other 10 4%
Unknown 236 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 65 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 54 20%
Student > Master 36 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 23 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 8%
Other 55 20%
Unknown 18 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 107 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 37 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 32 12%
Chemistry 27 10%
Computer Science 11 4%
Other 26 10%
Unknown 32 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2020.
All research outputs
#1,836,375
of 17,549,474 outputs
Outputs from Nature Reviews Drug Discovery
#935
of 2,928 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,213
of 299,146 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Reviews Drug Discovery
#26
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,549,474 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,928 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,146 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.