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Link between concentrations of sediment flux and deep crustal processes beneath the European Alps

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
Title
Link between concentrations of sediment flux and deep crustal processes beneath the European Alps
Published in
Scientific Reports, January 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-17182-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philippos Garefalakis, Fritz Schlunegger

Abstract

Large sediment fluxes from mountain belts have the potential to cause megafans to prograde into the neighbouring sedimentary basins. These mechanisms have been documented based from numerical modelling and stratigraphic records. However, little attention has been focused on inferring temporal changes in the concentrations of supplied sediment from coarse-grained deposits. Here, we extract changes of this variable in the field from a Late Oligocene, c. 4 km-thick suite of fluvial conglomerates situated in the North Alpine foreland basin, which evolved in response to the tectonic and erosional history of the Alps. We measure a decrease in channel depths from >2 m to <1 m and an increase in the largest grain sizes from <15 cm to >20 cm from the base to the top of the suite. These constraints are used to calculate an increase in fan surface slopes from <0.3° to >1.0° based on the Shields criteria for sediment entrainment. We combine slope and bulk grain size data with the Bagnold equation for sediment transport to infer higher concentrations of the supplied sediment. We use these shifts to propose a change towards faster erosion and a steeper landscape in the Alpine hinterland, driven by mantle-scale processes beneath the Alps.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 31%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 25%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Lecturer 1 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 56%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Environmental Science 1 6%
Engineering 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2018.
All research outputs
#407,177
of 12,352,887 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#4,526
of 56,119 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,941
of 355,113 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#514
of 6,948 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,352,887 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 56,119 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 355,113 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6,948 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.