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Anisotropic failure of Fourier theory in time-domain thermoreflectance experiments

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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129 Dimensions

Readers on

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196 Mendeley
Title
Anisotropic failure of Fourier theory in time-domain thermoreflectance experiments
Published in
Nature Communications, October 2014
DOI 10.1038/ncomms6075
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. B. Wilson, David G. Cahill

Abstract

The applicability of Fourier's law to heat transfer problems relies on the assumption that heat carriers have mean free paths smaller than important length scales of the temperature profile. This assumption is not generally valid in nanoscale thermal transport problems where spacing between boundaries is small (<1 μm), and temperature gradients vary rapidly in space. Here we study the limits to Fourier theory for analysing three-dimensional heat transfer problems in systems with an interface. We characterize the relationship between the failure of Fourier theory, phonon mean free paths, important length scales of the temperature profile and interfacial-phonon scattering by time-domain thermoreflectance experiments on Si, Si0.99Ge0.01, boron-doped Si and MgO crystals. The failure of Fourier theory causes anisotropic thermal transport. In situations where Fourier theory fails, a simple radiative boundary condition on the heat diffusion equation cannot adequately describe interfacial thermal transport.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 196 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 4%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 188 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 73 37%
Researcher 27 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 7%
Professor 14 7%
Student > Master 14 7%
Other 29 15%
Unknown 25 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 65 33%
Physics and Astronomy 60 31%
Materials Science 30 15%
Energy 6 3%
Chemical Engineering 3 2%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 29 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2014.
All research outputs
#1,397,314
of 12,918,691 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#12,045
of 22,180 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,407
of 211,858 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#427
of 823 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,918,691 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 22,180 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.1. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,858 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 823 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.