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Screening of Clock Gene Polymorphisms Demonstrates Association of a PER3 Polymorphism with Morningness–Eveningness Preference and Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

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76 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
158 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Screening of Clock Gene Polymorphisms Demonstrates Association of a PER3 Polymorphism with Morningness–Eveningness Preference and Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorder
Published in
Scientific Reports, September 2014
DOI 10.1038/srep06309
Pubmed ID
Authors

Akiko Hida, Shingo Kitamura, Yasuko Katayose, Mie Kato, Hiroko Ono, Hiroshi Kadotani, Makoto Uchiyama, Takashi Ebisawa, Yuichi Inoue, Yuichi Kamei, Masako Okawa, Kiyohisa Takahashi, Kazuo Mishima

Abstract

A system of self-sustained biological clocks controls the 24-h rhythms of behavioral and physiological processes such as the sleep-wake cycle. The circadian clock system is regulated by transcriptional and translational negative feedback loops of multiple clock genes. Polymorphisms in circadian clock genes have been associated with morningness-eveningness (diurnal) preference, familial advanced sleep phase type (ASPT), and delayed sleep phase type (DSPT). We genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms in circadian clock genes in 182 DSPT individuals, 67 free-running type (FRT) individuals, and 925 controls. The clock gene polymorphisms were tested for associations with diurnal preference and circadian rhythm sleep disorder (CRSD) phenotypes. The PER3 polymorphism (rs228697) was significantly associated with diurnal preference and the FRT phenotype. The minor allele of rs228697 was more prevalent in evening types than in morning types (sex-adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.483, Bonferroni-corrected P = 0.012) and in FRT individuals compared with the controls (age- and sex-adjusted OR, 2.021, permutated P = 0.017). Our findings support the notion that PER3 polymorphisms could be a potential genetic marker for an individual's circadian and sleep phenotypes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 158 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Unknown 155 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 19%
Student > Bachelor 26 16%
Researcher 25 16%
Student > Master 13 8%
Student > Postgraduate 12 8%
Other 30 19%
Unknown 22 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 15%
Neuroscience 18 11%
Psychology 11 7%
Other 12 8%
Unknown 29 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 March 2017.
All research outputs
#972,622
of 18,863,613 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#9,800
of 101,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,208
of 211,952 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,863,613 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 101,206 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,952 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them