↓ Skip to main content

Surface temperatures in New York City: Geospatial data enables the accurate prediction of radiative heat transfer

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, February 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
Title
Surface temperatures in New York City: Geospatial data enables the accurate prediction of radiative heat transfer
Published in
Scientific Reports, February 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-19846-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Masoud Ghandehari, Thorsten Emig, Milad Aghamohamadnia

Abstract

Despite decades of research seeking to derive the urban energy budget, the dynamics of thermal exchange in the densely constructed environment is not yet well understood. Using New York City as a study site, we present a novel hybrid experimental-computational approach for a better understanding of the radiative heat transfer in complex urban environments. The aim of this work is to contribute to the calculation of the urban energy budget, particularly the stored energy. We will focus our attention on surface thermal radiation. Improved understanding of urban thermodynamics incorporating the interaction of various bodies, particularly in high rise cities, will have implications on energy conservation at the building scale, and for human health and comfort at the urban scale. The platform presented is based on longwave hyperspectral imaging of nearly 100 blocks of Manhattan, in addition to a geospatial radiosity model that describes the collective radiative heat exchange between multiple buildings. Despite assumptions in surface emissivity and thermal conductivity of buildings walls, the close comparison of temperatures derived from measurements and computations is promising. Results imply that the presented geospatial thermodynamic model of urban structures can enable accurate and high resolution analysis of instantaneous urban surface temperatures.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 23%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Master 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 5%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 12 30%
Environmental Science 5 13%
Physics and Astronomy 3 8%
Computer Science 1 3%
Decision Sciences 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 15 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2018.
All research outputs
#8,794,885
of 14,555,594 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#40,935
of 75,680 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,597
of 269,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#81
of 196 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,555,594 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 75,680 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.7. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,103 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 196 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.