Two-stroke scooters are a dominant source of air pollution in many cities.

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
30 tweeters
weibo
1 weibo user
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
Title
Two-stroke scooters are a dominant source of air pollution in many cities.
Published in
Nature Communications, May 2014
DOI 10.1038/ncomms4749
Pubmed ID
Authors

S.M. Platt, I.El. Haddad, S.M. Pieber, R.-J. Huang, A.A. Zardini, M. Clairotte, R. Suarez-Bertoa, P. Barmet, L. Pfaffenberger, R. Wolf, J.G. Slowik, S.J. Fuller, M. Kalberer, R. Chirico, J. Dommen, C. Astorga, R. Zimmermann, N. Marchand, S. Hellebust, B. Temime-Roussel, U. Baltensperger, A.S.H. Prévôt, Platt SM, Haddad IE, Pieber SM, Huang RJ, Zardini AA, Clairotte M, Suarez-Bertoa R, Barmet P, Pfaffenberger L, Wolf R, Slowik JG, Fuller SJ, Kalberer M, Chirico R, Dommen J, Astorga C, Zimmermann R, Marchand N, Hellebust S, Temime-Roussel B, Baltensperger U, Prévôt AS

Abstract

Fossil fuel-powered vehicles emit significant particulate matter, for example, black carbon and primary organic aerosol, and produce secondary organic aerosol. Here we quantify secondary organic aerosol production from two-stroke scooters. Cars and trucks, particularly diesel vehicles, are thought to be the main vehicular pollution sources. This needs re-thinking, as we show that elevated particulate matter levels can be a consequence of 'asymmetric pollution' from two-stroke scooters, vehicles that constitute a small fraction of the fleet, but can dominate urban vehicular pollution through organic aerosol and aromatic emission factors up to thousands of times higher than from other vehicle classes. Further, we demonstrate that oxidation processes producing secondary organic aerosol from vehicle exhaust also form potentially toxic 'reactive oxygen species'.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 30 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 8%
United Kingdom 2 4%
Italy 1 2%
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 40 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 27%
Researcher 8 17%
Student > Master 6 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 13%
Professor 3 6%
Other 12 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 13 27%
Chemistry 11 23%
Engineering 7 15%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 9 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 130. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2016.
All research outputs
#45,453
of 7,165,705 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#744
of 10,850 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,419
of 173,113 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#34
of 518 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,165,705 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,850 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 173,113 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 518 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.