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Nanoscale imaging of clinical specimens using pathology-optimized expansion microscopy

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Biotechnology, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Citations

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131 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
380 Mendeley
Title
Nanoscale imaging of clinical specimens using pathology-optimized expansion microscopy
Published in
Nature Biotechnology, July 2017
DOI 10.1038/nbt.3892
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yongxin Zhao, Octavian Bucur, Humayun Irshad, Fei Chen, Astrid Weins, Andreea L Stancu, Eun-Young Oh, Marcello DiStasio, Vanda Torous, Benjamin Glass, Isaac E Stillman, Stuart J Schnitt, Andrew H Beck, Edward S Boyden

Abstract

Expansion microscopy (ExM), a method for improving the resolution of light microscopy by physically expanding a specimen, has not been applied to clinical tissue samples. Here we report a clinically optimized form of ExM that supports nanoscale imaging of human tissue specimens that have been fixed with formalin, embedded in paraffin, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and/or fresh frozen. The method, which we call expansion pathology (ExPath), converts clinical samples into an ExM-compatible state, then applies an ExM protocol with protein anchoring and mechanical homogenization steps optimized for clinical samples. ExPath enables ∼70-nm-resolution imaging of diverse biomolecules in intact tissues using conventional diffraction-limited microscopes and standard antibody and fluorescent DNA in situ hybridization reagents. We use ExPath for optical diagnosis of kidney minimal-change disease, a process that previously required electron microscopy, and we demonstrate high-fidelity computational discrimination between early breast neoplastic lesions for which pathologists often disagree in classification. ExPath may enable the routine use of nanoscale imaging in pathology and clinical research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 91 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 380 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 380 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 87 23%
Researcher 75 20%
Student > Bachelor 41 11%
Student > Master 39 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 20 5%
Other 58 15%
Unknown 60 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 92 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 50 13%
Engineering 44 12%
Neuroscience 39 10%
Chemistry 29 8%
Other 58 15%
Unknown 68 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 194. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2021.
All research outputs
#153,332
of 21,786,000 outputs
Outputs from Nature Biotechnology
#327
of 8,021 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,302
of 229,287 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Biotechnology
#8
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,786,000 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,021 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,287 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.