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Impairment of Neuroplasticity in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex by Alcohol

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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63 Mendeley
Title
Impairment of Neuroplasticity in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex by Alcohol
Published in
Scientific Reports, July 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-04764-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Genane Loheswaran, Mera S. Barr, Reza Zomorrodi, Tarek K. Rajji, Daniel M. Blumberger, Bernard Le Foll, Zafiris J. Daskalakis

Abstract

Previous studies have demonstrated that alcohol consumption impairs neuroplasticity in the motor cortex. However, it is unknown whether alcohol produces a similar impairment of neuroplasticity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), a brain region that plays an important role in cognitive functioning. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of alcohol intoxication on neuroplasticity in the DLPFC. Paired associative stimulation (PAS) combined with electroencephalography (EEG) was used for the induction and measurement of associative LTP-like neuroplasticity in the DLPFC. Fifteen healthy subjects were administered PAS to the DLPFC following consumption of an alcohol (1.5 g/l of body water) or placebo beverage in a within-subject cross-over design. PAS induced neuroplasticity was indexed up to 60 minutes following PAS. Additionally, the effect of alcohol on PAS-induced potentiation of theta-gamma coupling (an index associated with learning and memory) was examined prior to and following PAS. Alcohol consumption resulted in a significant impairment of mean (t = 2.456, df = 13, p = 0.029) and maximum potentiation (t = -2.945, df = 13, p = 0.011) compared to the placebo beverage in the DLPFC and globally. Alcohol also suppressed the potentiation of theta-gamma coupling by PAS. Findings from the present study provide a potential neurophysiological mechanism for impairment of cognitive functioning by alcohol.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 22%
Student > Master 9 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Researcher 5 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 16 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 19%
Neuroscience 10 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Sports and Recreations 2 3%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 23 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 January 2020.
All research outputs
#8,800,025
of 16,597,904 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#37,626
of 88,427 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,400
of 268,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#215
of 500 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,597,904 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 88,427 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,945 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 500 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.