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Large-scale physical activity data reveal worldwide activity inequality

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#43 of 51,365)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Readers on

mendeley
463 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Large-scale physical activity data reveal worldwide activity inequality
Published in
Nature, July 2017
DOI 10.1038/nature23018
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tim Althoff, Rok Sosič, Jennifer L. Hicks, Abby C. King, Scott L. Delp, Jure Leskovec, Althoff, Tim, Sosič, Rok, Hicks, Jennifer L., King, Abby C., Delp, Scott L., Leskovec, Jure, Althoff T, Sosič R, Hicks JL, King AC, Delp SL, Leskovec J

Abstract

To be able to curb the global pandemic of physical inactivity and the associated 5.3 million deaths per year, we need to understand the basic principles that govern physical activity. However, there is a lack of large-scale measurements of physical activity patterns across free-living populations worldwide. Here we leverage the wide usage of smartphones with built-in accelerometry to measure physical activity at the global scale. We study a dataset consisting of 68 million days of physical activity for 717,527 people, giving us a window into activity in 111 countries across the globe. We find inequality in how activity is distributed within countries and that this inequality is a better predictor of obesity prevalence in the population than average activity volume. Reduced activity in females contributes to a large portion of the observed activity inequality. Aspects of the built environment, such as the walkability of a city, are associated with a smaller gender gap in activity and lower activity inequality. In more walkable cities, activity is greater throughout the day and throughout the week, across age, gender, and body mass index (BMI) groups, with the greatest increases in activity found for females. Our findings have implications for global public health policy and urban planning and highlight the role of activity inequality and the built environment in improving physical activity and health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2,117 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 463 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 463 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 127 27%
Researcher 90 19%
Student > Master 75 16%
Student > Bachelor 41 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 30 6%
Other 98 21%
Unknown 2 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Computer Science 132 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 53 11%
Unspecified 46 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 7%
Engineering 26 6%
Other 172 37%
Unknown 2 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2702. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 April 2018.
All research outputs
#185
of 9,717,007 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#43
of 51,365 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19
of 255,592 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#5
of 719 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,717,007 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 51,365 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 77.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,592 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 719 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.