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Contrasting effects of environment and genetics generate a continuum of parallel evolution

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
95 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
134 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
214 Mendeley
Title
Contrasting effects of environment and genetics generate a continuum of parallel evolution
Published in
Nature Ecology & Evolution, May 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41559-017-0158
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yoel E. Stuart, Thor Veen, Jesse N. Weber, Dieta Hanson, Mark Ravinet, Brian K. Lohman, Cole J. Thompson, Tania Tasneem, Andrew Doggett, Rebecca Izen, Newaz Ahmed, Rowan D. H. Barrett, Andrew P. Hendry, Catherine L. Peichel, Daniel I. Bolnick

Abstract

Parallel evolution of similar traits by independent populations in similar environments is considered strong evidence for adaptation by natural selection. Often, however, replicate populations in similar environments do not all evolve in the same way, thus deviating from any single, predominant outcome of evolution. This variation might arise from non-adaptive, population-specific effects of genetic drift, gene flow or limited genetic variation. Alternatively, these deviations from parallel evolution might also reflect predictable adaptation to cryptic environmental heterogeneity within discrete habitat categories. Here, we show that deviations from parallel evolution are the consequence of environmental variation within habitats combined with variation in gene flow. Threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in adjoining lake and stream habitats (a lake-stream 'pair') diverge phenotypically, yet the direction and magnitude of this divergence is not always fully parallel among 16 replicate pairs. We found that the multivariate direction of lake-stream morphological divergence was less parallel between pairs whose environmental differences were less parallel. Thus, environmental heterogeneity among lake-stream pairs contributes to deviations from parallel evolution. Additionally, likely genomic targets of selection were more parallel between environmentally more similar pairs. In contrast, variation in the magnitude of lake-stream divergence (independent of direction) was better explained by differences in lake-stream gene flow; pairs with greater lake-stream gene flow were less morphologically diverged. Thus, both adaptive and non-adaptive processes work concurrently to generate a continuum of parallel evolution across lake-stream stickleback population pairs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 95 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 214 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 213 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 77 36%
Student > Master 37 17%
Researcher 26 12%
Student > Bachelor 18 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 6%
Other 20 9%
Unknown 24 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 113 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 40 19%
Environmental Science 27 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 <1%
Social Sciences 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 29 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 90. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2021.
All research outputs
#291,211
of 18,148,646 outputs
Outputs from Nature Ecology & Evolution
#581
of 1,404 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,178
of 278,255 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Ecology & Evolution
#34
of 86 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,148,646 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,404 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 154.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,255 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 86 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.