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Impacts and mitigation of excess diesel-related NOx emissions in 11 major vehicle markets

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
122 news outlets
blogs
12 blogs
twitter
324 tweeters
facebook
13 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users

Readers on

mendeley
84 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Impacts and mitigation of excess diesel-related NOx emissions in 11 major vehicle markets
Published in
Nature, May 2017
DOI 10.1038/nature22086
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan C. Anenberg, Joshua Miller, Ray Minjares, Li Du, Daven K. Henze, Forrest Lacey, Christopher S. Malley, Lisa Emberson, Vicente Franco, Zbigniew Klimont, Chris Heyes

Abstract

Vehicle emissions contribute to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and tropospheric ozone air pollution, affecting human health, crop yields and climate worldwide. On-road diesel vehicles produce approximately 20 per cent of global anthropogenic emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), which are key PM2.5 and ozone precursors. Regulated NOx emission limits in leading markets have been progressively tightened, but current diesel vehicles emit far more NOx under real-world operating conditions than during laboratory certification testing. Here we show that across 11 markets, representing approximately 80 per cent of global diesel vehicle sales, nearly one-third of on-road heavy-duty diesel vehicle emissions and over half of on-road light-duty diesel vehicle emissions are in excess of certification limits. These excess emissions (totalling 4.6 million tons) are associated with about 38,000 PM2.5- and ozone-related premature deaths globally in 2015, including about 10 per cent of all ozone-related premature deaths in the 28 European Union member states. Heavy-duty vehicles are the dominant contributor to excess diesel NOx emissions and associated health impacts in almost all regions. Adopting and enforcing next-generation standards (more stringent than Euro 6/VI) could nearly eliminate real-world diesel-related NOx emissions in these markets, avoiding approximately 174,000 global PM2.5- and ozone-related premature deaths in 2040. Most of these benefits can be achieved by implementing Euro VI standards where they have not yet been adopted for heavy-duty vehicles.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 324 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Korea, Republic of 1 1%
Unknown 83 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 27%
Researcher 23 27%
Student > Master 11 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Other 6 7%
Other 15 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 21 25%
Engineering 15 18%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 11 13%
Unspecified 8 10%
Chemistry 4 5%
Other 25 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1315. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,038
of 8,667,662 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#229
of 48,848 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103
of 254,384 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#12
of 754 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,667,662 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 48,848 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 76.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,384 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 754 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.