↓ Skip to main content

Formants provide honest acoustic cues to body size in American alligators

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, May 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
Title
Formants provide honest acoustic cues to body size in American alligators
Published in
Scientific Reports, May 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-01948-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephan A. Reber, Judith Janisch, Kevin Torregrosa, Jim Darlington, Kent A. Vliet, W. Tecumseh Fitch

Abstract

In many vertebrates, acoustic cues to body size are encoded in resonance frequencies of the vocal tract ("formants"), rather than in the rate of tissue vibration in the sound source ("pitch"). Anatomical constraints on the vocal tract's size render formants honest cues to size in many bird and mammal species, but it is not clear whether this correlation evolved convergently in these two clades, or whether it is widespread among amniotes (mammals, birds, and non-avian reptiles). We investigated the potential for honest acoustic cues in the bellows of adult American alligators and found that formant spacing provided highly reliable cues to body size, while presumed correlates of the source signal did not. These findings held true for both sexes and for all bellows whether produced in or out of water. Because birds and crocodilians are the last extant Archosaurians and share common ancestry with all extinct dinosaurs, our findings support the hypothesis that dinosaurs used formants as cues to body size. The description of formants as honest signals in a non-avian reptile combined with previous evidence from birds and mammals strongly suggests that the principle of honest signalling via vocal tract resonances may be a broadly shared trait among amniotes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 20%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 6 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 61%
Environmental Science 2 5%
Physics and Astronomy 2 5%
Linguistics 2 5%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 8 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 114. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2021.
All research outputs
#225,215
of 18,313,653 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#2,642
of 98,865 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,556
of 274,986 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#92
of 2,266 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,313,653 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 98,865 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,986 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,266 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.