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Prophage WO genes recapitulate and enhance Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
19 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
268 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
272 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
383 Mendeley
Title
Prophage WO genes recapitulate and enhance Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility
Published in
Nature, February 2017
DOI 10.1038/nature21391
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel P. LePage, Jason A. Metcalf, Sarah R. Bordenstein, Jungmin On, Jessamyn I. Perlmutter, J. Dylan Shropshire, Emily M. Layton, Lisa J. Funkhouser-Jones, John F. Beckmann, Seth R. Bordenstein

Abstract

The genus Wolbachia is an archetype of maternally inherited intracellular bacteria that infect the germline of numerous invertebrate species worldwide. They can selfishly alter arthropod sex ratios and reproductive strategies to increase the proportion of the infected matriline in the population. The most common reproductive manipulation is cytoplasmic incompatibility, which results in embryonic lethality in crosses between infected males and uninfected females. Females infected with the same Wolbachia strain rescue this lethality. Despite more than 40 years of research and relevance to symbiont-induced speciation, as well as control of arbovirus vectors and agricultural pests, the bacterial genes underlying cytoplasmic incompatibility remain unknown. Here we use comparative and transgenic approaches to demonstrate that two differentially transcribed, co-diverging genes in the eukaryotic association module of prophage WO from Wolbachia strain wMel recapitulate and enhance cytoplasmic incompatibility. Dual expression in transgenic, uninfected males of Drosophila melanogaster crossed to uninfected females causes embryonic lethality. Each gene additively augments embryonic lethality in crosses between infected males and uninfected females. Lethality associates with embryonic defects that parallel those of wild-type cytoplasmic incompatibility and is notably rescued by wMel-infected embryos in all cases. The discovery of cytoplasmic incompatibility factor genes cifA and cifB pioneers genetic studies of prophage WO-induced reproductive manipulations and informs the continuing use of Wolbachia to control dengue and Zika virus transmission to humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 268 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 383 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 373 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 80 21%
Researcher 76 20%
Student > Master 52 14%
Student > Bachelor 50 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 5%
Other 62 16%
Unknown 45 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 162 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 104 27%
Immunology and Microbiology 17 4%
Environmental Science 11 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 3%
Other 24 6%
Unknown 54 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 347. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 March 2022.
All research outputs
#67,557
of 21,415,362 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#5,672
of 88,032 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,921
of 277,000 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#157
of 889 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,415,362 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 88,032 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 97.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,000 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 889 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.