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Insulin-like signalling to the maternal germline controls progeny response to osmotic stress

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Cell Biology, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
27 tweeters

Citations

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49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
84 Mendeley
Title
Insulin-like signalling to the maternal germline controls progeny response to osmotic stress
Published in
Nature Cell Biology, February 2017
DOI 10.1038/ncb3470
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicholas O. Burton, Tokiko Furuta, Amy K. Webster, Rebecca E. W. Kaplan, L. Ryan Baugh, Swathi Arur, H. Robert Horvitz

Abstract

In 1893 August Weismann proposed that information about the environment could not pass from somatic cells to germ cells, a hypothesis now known as the Weismann barrier. However, recent studies have indicated that parental exposure to environmental stress can modify progeny physiology and that parental stress can contribute to progeny disorders. The mechanisms regulating these phenomena are poorly understood. We report that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans can protect itself from osmotic stress by entering a state of arrested development and can protect its progeny from osmotic stress by increasing the expression of the glycerol biosynthetic enzyme GPDH-2 in progeny. Both of these protective mechanisms are regulated by insulin-like signalling: insulin-like signalling to the intestine regulates developmental arrest, while insulin-like signalling to the maternal germline regulates glycerol metabolism in progeny. Thus, there is a heritable link between insulin-like signalling to the maternal germline and progeny metabolism and gene expression. We speculate that analogous modulation of insulin-like signalling to the germline is responsible for effects of the maternal environment on human diseases that involve insulin signalling, such as obesity and type-2 diabetes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Unknown 82 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 24%
Researcher 15 18%
Student > Bachelor 13 15%
Student > Master 7 8%
Professor 5 6%
Other 14 17%
Unknown 10 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 38 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 2%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 11 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2019.
All research outputs
#1,250,690
of 15,283,645 outputs
Outputs from Nature Cell Biology
#689
of 3,296 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,086
of 355,177 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Cell Biology
#18
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,283,645 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,296 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 355,177 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.