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Recent extinctions disturb path to equilibrium diversity in Caribbean bats

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
78 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
82 Mendeley
Title
Recent extinctions disturb path to equilibrium diversity in Caribbean bats
Published in
Nature Ecology & Evolution, January 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41559-016-0026
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luis Valente, Rampal S. Etienne, Liliana M. Dávalos

Abstract

Islands are ideal systems to model temporal changes in biodiversity and reveal the influence of humans on natural communities. Although theory predicts biodiversity on islands tends towards an equilibrium value, the recent extinction of large proportions of island biotas complicates testing this model. The well-preserved subfossil record of Caribbean bats-involving multiple insular radiations-provides a rare opportunity to model diversity dynamics in an insular community. Here, we reconstruct the diversity trajectory in noctilionoid bats of the Greater Antilles by applying a dynamic model of colonization, extinction and speciation to phylogenetic and palaeontological data including all known extinct and extant species. We show species richness asymptotes to an equilibrium value, a demonstration of natural equilibrium dynamics across an entire community. However, recent extinctions-many caused by humans-have wiped out nearly a third of island lineages, dragging diversity away from equilibrium. Using a metric to measure island biodiversity loss, we estimate it will take at least eight million years to regain pre-human diversity levels. Our integrative approach reveals how anthropogenic extinctions can drastically alter the natural trajectory of biological communities, resulting in evolutionary disequilibrium.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 78 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Germany 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Unknown 78 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 22%
Researcher 13 16%
Student > Bachelor 13 16%
Student > Master 11 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 6%
Other 14 17%
Unknown 8 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 49 60%
Environmental Science 11 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 5%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 10 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 132. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 May 2020.
All research outputs
#212,829
of 19,982,192 outputs
Outputs from Nature Ecology & Evolution
#436
of 1,501 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,478
of 410,124 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Ecology & Evolution
#11
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,982,192 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,501 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 154.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 410,124 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.