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Population cycles and species diversity in dynamic Kill-the-Winner model of microbial ecosystems

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
25 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
55 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
152 Mendeley
Title
Population cycles and species diversity in dynamic Kill-the-Winner model of microbial ecosystems
Published in
Scientific Reports, January 2017
DOI 10.1038/srep39642
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sergei Maslov, Kim Sneppen

Abstract

Determinants of species diversity in microbial ecosystems remain poorly understood. Bacteriophages are believed to increase the diversity by the virtue of Kill-the-Winner infection bias preventing the fastest growing organism from taking over the community. Phage-bacterial ecosystems are traditionally described in terms of the static equilibrium state of Lotka-Volterra equations in which bacterial growth is exactly balanced by losses due to phage predation. Here we consider a more dynamic scenario in which phage infections give rise to abrupt and severe collapses of bacterial populations whenever they become sufficiently large. As a consequence, each bacterial population in our model follows cyclic dynamics of exponential growth interrupted by sudden declines. The total population of all species fluctuates around the carrying capacity of the environment, making these cycles cryptic. While a subset of the slowest growing species in our model is always driven towards extinction, in general the overall ecosystem diversity remains high. The number of surviving species is inversely proportional to the variation in their growth rates but increases with the frequency and severity of phage-induced collapses. Thus counter-intuitively we predict that microbial communities exposed to more violent perturbations should have higher diversity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 152 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 <1%
Unknown 151 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 26%
Student > Bachelor 24 16%
Researcher 21 14%
Student > Master 17 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Other 17 11%
Unknown 23 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 38 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 34 22%
Immunology and Microbiology 21 14%
Environmental Science 7 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 4%
Other 19 13%
Unknown 27 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 25. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 March 2020.
All research outputs
#955,652
of 17,363,630 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#9,532
of 93,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,830
of 393,991 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#573
of 5,134 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,363,630 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 93,392 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 393,991 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,134 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.