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The presence of Anf/Hesx1 homeobox gene in lampreys suggests that it could play an important role in emergence of telencephalon

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 news outlets
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3 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

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14 Mendeley
Title
The presence of Anf/Hesx1 homeobox gene in lampreys suggests that it could play an important role in emergence of telencephalon
Published in
Scientific Reports, December 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep39849
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrey V. Bayramov, Galina V. Ermakova, Fedor M. Eroshkin, Alexandr V. Kucheryavyy, Natalia Y. Martynova, Andrey G. Zaraisky

Abstract

Accumulated evidence indicates that the core genetic mechanisms regulating early patterning of the brain rudiment in vertebrates are very similar to those operating during development of the anterior region of invertebrate embryos. However, the mechanisms underlying the morphological differences between the elaborate vertebrate brain and its simpler invertebrate counterpart remain poorly understood. Recently, we hypothesized that the emergence of the most anterior unit of the vertebrate brain, the telencephalon, could be related to the appearance in vertebrates' ancestors of a unique homeobox gene, Anf/Hesx1(further Anf), which is absent from all invertebrates and regulates the earliest steps of telencephalon development in vertebrates. However, the failure of Anf to be detected in one of the most basal extant vertebrate species, the lamprey, seriously compromises this hypothesis. Here, we report the cloning of Anf in three lamprey species and demonstrate that this gene is indeed expressed in embryos in the same pattern as in other vertebrates and executes the same functions by inhibiting the expression of the anterior general regulator Otx2 in favour of the telencephalic regulator FoxG1. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Anf homeobox gene may have been important in the evolution of the telencephalon.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 7%
Argentina 1 7%
Unknown 12 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 57%
Student > Master 2 14%
Other 1 7%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Unknown 2 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 21%
Neuroscience 2 14%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 25. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2017.
All research outputs
#824,127
of 15,814,274 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#8,239
of 82,346 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,267
of 385,744 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#555
of 5,091 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,814,274 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 82,346 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 385,744 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,091 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.