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High resolution 3D imaging of living cells with sub-optical wavelength phonons

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
21 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
26 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
75 Mendeley
Title
High resolution 3D imaging of living cells with sub-optical wavelength phonons
Published in
Scientific Reports, December 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep39326
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fernando Pérez-Cota, Richard J. Smith, Emilia Moradi, Leonel Marques, Kevin F. Webb, Matt Clark

Abstract

Label-free imaging of living cells below the optical diffraction limit poses great challenges for optical microscopy. Biologically relevant structural information remains below the Rayleigh limit and beyond the reach of conventional microscopes. Super-resolution techniques are typically based on the non-linear and stochastic response of fluorescent labels which can be toxic and interfere with cell function. In this paper we present, for the first time, imaging of live cells using sub-optical wavelength phonons. The axial imaging resolution of our system is determined by the acoustic wavelength (λa = λprobe/2n) and not on the NA of the optics allowing sub-optical wavelength acoustic sectioning of samples using the time of flight. The transverse resolution is currently limited to the optical spot size. The contrast mechanism is significantly determined by the mechanical properties of the cells and requires no additional contrast agent, stain or label to image the cell structure. The ability to breach the optical diffraction limit to image living cells acoustically promises to bring a new suite of imaging technologies to bear in answering exigent questions in cell biology and biomedicine.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 26 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 72 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 27%
Researcher 15 20%
Student > Master 11 15%
Lecturer 5 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 4%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 11 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 18 24%
Engineering 13 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 9%
Chemistry 7 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 15 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 186. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 January 2017.
All research outputs
#122,370
of 18,090,077 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#1,508
of 97,995 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,321
of 395,687 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#86
of 5,137 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,090,077 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 97,995 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 395,687 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,137 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.