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Unusual marine unicellular symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium UCYN-A

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Microbiology, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
31 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
129 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Unusual marine unicellular symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium UCYN-A
Published in
Nature Microbiology, December 2016
DOI 10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.214
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonathan P. Zehr, Irina N. Shilova, Hanna M. Farnelid, Maria del Carmen Muñoz-Marín, Kendra A. Turk-Kubo

Abstract

Nitrogen fixation - the reduction of dinitrogen (N2) gas to biologically available nitrogen (N) - is an important source of N for terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. In terrestrial environments, N2-fixing symbioses involve multicellular plants, but in the marine environment these symbioses occur with unicellular planktonic algae. An unusual symbiosis between an uncultivated unicellular cyanobacterium (UCYN-A) and a haptophyte picoplankton alga was recently discovered in oligotrophic oceans. UCYN-A has a highly reduced genome, and exchanges fixed N for fixed carbon with its host. This symbiosis bears some resemblance to symbioses found in freshwater ecosystems. UCYN-A shares many core genes with the 'spheroid bodies' of Epithemia turgida and the endosymbionts of the amoeba Paulinella chromatophora. UCYN-A is widely distributed, and has diversified into a number of sublineages that could be ecotypes. Many questions remain regarding the physical and genetic mechanisms of the association, but UCYN-A is an intriguing model for contemplating the evolution of N2-fixing organelles.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 31 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 129 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 124 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 23%
Researcher 26 20%
Student > Master 19 15%
Student > Bachelor 10 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 20 16%
Unknown 16 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 41 32%
Environmental Science 22 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 15%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 13 10%
Engineering 6 5%
Other 9 7%
Unknown 19 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 May 2020.
All research outputs
#817,964
of 18,247,290 outputs
Outputs from Nature Microbiology
#720
of 1,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,686
of 396,387 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Microbiology
#37
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,247,290 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 87.5. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 396,387 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.