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Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
261 tweeters
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

dimensions_citation
98 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
303 Mendeley
Title
Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells
Published in
Nature Communications, November 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms13333
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jakob Haaber, Jørgen J. Leisner, Marianne T. Cohn, Arancha Catalan-Moreno, Jesper B. Nielsen, Henrik Westh, José R. Penadés, Hanne Ingmer

Abstract

Prophages are quiescent viruses located in the chromosomes of bacteria. In the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, prophages are omnipresent and are believed to be responsible for the spread of some antibiotic resistance genes. Here we demonstrate that release of phages from a subpopulation of S. aureus cells enables the intact, prophage-containing population to acquire beneficial genes from competing, phage-susceptible strains present in the same environment. Phage infection kills competitor cells and bits of their DNA are occasionally captured in viral transducing particles. Return of such particles to the prophage-containing population can drive the transfer of genes encoding potentially useful traits such as antibiotic resistance. This process, which can be viewed as 'auto-transduction', allows S. aureus to efficiently acquire antibiotic resistance both in vitro and in an in vivo virulence model (wax moth larvae) and enables it to proliferate under strong antibiotic selection pressure. Our results may help to explain the rapid exchange of antibiotic resistance genes observed in S. aureus.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 261 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 303 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Hungary 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 296 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 80 26%
Student > Bachelor 51 17%
Student > Master 44 15%
Researcher 42 14%
Student > Postgraduate 14 5%
Other 37 12%
Unknown 35 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 100 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 58 19%
Immunology and Microbiology 47 16%
Environmental Science 13 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 3%
Other 27 9%
Unknown 49 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 154. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 September 2018.
All research outputs
#162,290
of 18,731,132 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#2,448
of 37,071 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,957
of 303,270 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#256
of 2,816 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,731,132 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 37,071 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 53.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 303,270 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,816 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.