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The complex evolutionary history of the tympanic middle ear in frogs and toads (Anura)

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, September 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
87 Mendeley
Title
The complex evolutionary history of the tympanic middle ear in frogs and toads (Anura)
Published in
Scientific Reports, September 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep34130
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martín O. Pereyra, Molly C. Womack, J. Sebastián Barrionuevo, Boris L. Blotto, Diego Baldo, Mariane Targino, Jhon Jairo Ospina-Sarria, Juan M. Guayasamin, Luis A. Coloma, Kim L. Hoke, Taran Grant, Julián Faivovich

Abstract

Most anurans possess a tympanic middle ear (TME) that transmits sound waves to the inner ear; however, numerous species lack some or all TME components. To understand the evolution of these structures, we undertook a comprehensive assessment of their occurrence across anurans and performed ancestral character state reconstructions. Our analysis indicates that the TME was completely lost at least 38 independent times in Anura. The inferred evolutionary history of the TME is exceptionally complex in true toads (Bufonidae), where it was lost in the most recent common ancestor, preceding a radiation of >150 earless species. Following that initial loss, independent regains of some or all TME structures were inferred within two minor clades and in a radiation of >400 species. The reappearance of the TME in the latter clade was followed by at least 10 losses of the entire TME. The many losses and gains of the TME in anurans is unparalleled among tetrapods. Our results show that anurans, and especially bufonid toads, are an excellent model to study the behavioural correlates of earlessness, extratympanic sound pathways, and the genetic and developmental mechanisms that underlie the morphogenesis of TME structures.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 86 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 17%
Student > Bachelor 14 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Student > Master 5 6%
Other 17 20%
Unknown 14 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 55%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 6%
Environmental Science 4 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Neuroscience 2 2%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 16 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 August 2019.
All research outputs
#1,167,553
of 17,816,628 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#11,201
of 96,116 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,455
of 277,015 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#407
of 3,381 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,816,628 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 96,116 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,015 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,381 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.