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Projected land photosynthesis constrained by changes in the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
28 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
99 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
269 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Projected land photosynthesis constrained by changes in the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2
Published in
Nature, September 2016
DOI 10.1038/nature19772
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sabrina Wenzel, Peter M. Cox, Veronika Eyring, Pierre Friedlingstein

Abstract

Uncertainties in the response of vegetation to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations contribute to the large spread in projections of future climate change. Climate-carbon cycle models generally agree that elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations will enhance terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP). However, the magnitude of this CO2 fertilization effect varies from a 20 per cent to a 60 per cent increase in GPP for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentrations in model studies. Here we demonstrate emergent constraints on large-scale CO2 fertilization using observed changes in the amplitude of the atmospheric CO2 seasonal cycle that are thought to be the result of increasing terrestrial GPP. Our comparison of atmospheric CO2 measurements from Point Barrow in Alaska and Cape Kumukahi in Hawaii with historical simulations of the latest climate-carbon cycle models demonstrates that the increase in the amplitude of the CO2 seasonal cycle at both measurement sites is consistent with increasing annual mean GPP, driven in part by climate warming, but with differences in CO2 fertilization controlling the spread among the model trends. As a result, the relationship between the amplitude of the CO2 seasonal cycle and the magnitude of CO2 fertilization of GPP is almost linear across the entire ensemble of models. When combined with the observed trends in the seasonal CO2 amplitude, these relationships lead to consistent emergent constraints on the CO2 fertilization of GPP. Overall, we estimate a GPP increase of 37 ± 9 per cent for high-latitude ecosystems and 32 ± 9 per cent for extratropical ecosystems under a doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentrations on the basis of the Point Barrow and Cape Kumukahi records, respectively.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 269 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 264 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 68 25%
Researcher 68 25%
Professor 22 8%
Student > Master 19 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 14 5%
Other 41 15%
Unknown 37 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 85 32%
Environmental Science 66 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 9%
Engineering 8 3%
Physics and Astronomy 7 3%
Other 27 10%
Unknown 52 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 77. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2021.
All research outputs
#381,825
of 19,629,044 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#19,464
of 84,356 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,575
of 286,981 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#509
of 1,039 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,629,044 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 84,356 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 94.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,981 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,039 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.